How to Use Match Types for Keywords

Keyword match types in Gemini help you specify how close your customer search query matches your keyword. Using more keywords and closer matches may enable you to achieve a higher conversion rate but can also limit impressions.

Match Types To Use as Keywords

Use the following match types as keywords in Gemini:

  • Broad match – If a user searches on relevant words in the same or similar order as your keyword, then your ads may show. It’s the default match type for all the keywords in Gemini. Ads may appear on search queries that contain all relevant variants, such as close variants, synonyms, and related searches. For example, if your keyword is purple point, then your ads can be triggered by purple point, point is purple, point purple, purple circle, or point circle.
  • Broad match modifier – Your ads will show if a search term contains the keyword you defined with a plus (+). The plus symbol indicates which word(s) must be part of the user query in order for an ad to be considered to serve for a query. For example, if your keyword is purple +point, then your ads can be triggered by purple point, point is purple, point purple. For more information, refer to the section on how to Use Gemini’s Broad Match Modifier.
  • Phrase match – If a user searches on words that contain a phrase or close variations of the phrase as your keyword, then your ads may show. For example, if you enter your phrase match keyword in quotation, such as “purple point”, then your ads can be triggered by get a purple point, or get purple points.
  • Exact match – If a user searches on the exact words or close variants as your keyword, then your ads may show. For example, if you enter your exact match keyword in brackets, such as [purple point], then your ads can be triggered only by purple point or purple points.
  • Negative match – Your ads will not show if a search term contains the keyword you defined as negative. For example, if you enter your negative match keyword with a minus sign, such as -purple point, then your ads will not be triggered when users search for purple point. By default, the negative terms are phase matched. If you want to blacklist a particular term, you can add brackets at the beginning/end of the phrase, such as -[red car]. By doing so, even if you bid “car” as broad match, your ads won’t be shown with the query “red car”. Gemini supports both negative exact match and negative phrase match. You can define the negative match types in the bulksheet.

Note

This markup is used for adding keywords and negative keywords in the Gemini UI. It’s different from what you would use in the Gemini bulksheet. For more information, refer to the section describing match types in Keyword bulk fields and objects.

Example Use Case of Match Types, Keywords & Searches

For an example use case, take a look at the table below. The table illustrates the various match types, example keywords and example searches, using the term red sports car.

Match Type Special Symbol Example keyword Ads shown on searches that Example searches
Broad none red sports car include singular/plural form of the words, misspellings, acronyms, synonyms, other-related searches and other variants.
  • red
  • car
  • sports
  • red car
  • sports car
  • red sports car
  • sports vehicles
Broad match modifier +keyword +red include the specific term(s) red sports car
Phrase ‘’keyword’‘ ‘’red sports car’‘ are a phrase or a close variation on the phrase purchase red sports car
Exact [keyword] [red sports car] are an exact match or close variations on the term red sports car red sports cars
Negative -keyword -red do not include the specific term purple sports car

About Close Variants

No human is perfect. When a user enters words or phrases into a search query, there may be misspellings, misuse of punctuations or abbreviations, and so on, thus leaving the task of figuring out the most relevant and optimal results to the search engine.

To save you time and effort when building out your keyword lists, Gemini automatically expands keyword matching for close variants of the words.

For example, all of the following are close variants:

  • Plurals: shoe, shoes.
  • Stemming: sing lessons, singing lessons.
  • Misspellings: valcano vacations, volcano vacations.
  • Common spelling variations: color, colour.
  • Abbreviations and acronyms: hollywood ca, hollywood california.
  • Word blending and splitting: cruise excursions, cruiseexcursions.
  • Certain punctuations: yahoo, yahoo!
  • Websites: www.yahoo.com, yahoo.com, yahoo
  • Certain stopwords: hotel in new york, hotel new york
  • Different order of words but same meaning: yahoo gemini, gemini yahoo.